Managing Marketing: The expanding role of the media agency in marketing

Managing Marketing is a podcast hosted by TrinityP3 Founder and Global CEO, Darren Woolley. Each podcast is a conversation with a thought-leader, professional or practitioner of marketing and communications on the issues, insights and opportunities in the marketing management category. Ideal for marketers, advertisers, media and commercial communications professionals.

Mat Baxter, Global Chief Strategy and Creative Office at IPG Mediabrands chats with Darren on media, new business and why media agencies struggle with new business along with the increasing role of data in influencing media decisions and the how media agencies and creative agencies are coming back together with media leading the process and why.

Mat Baxter

You can listen to the podcast here:

Follow Managing Marketing on Soundcloud or iTunes

Transcription:

Darren:

Welcome to Managing Marketing and we’re in New York City, a long way from home and I’ve actually run into an old friend from Sydney, Mat Baxter Global Chief Strategy and Creative Officer at IPG Mediabrands, welcome Mat.

Mat:

Hi Darren.

Darren:

Great to see you.

Mat:

Good to see you.

Darren:

You’re looking fabulous by the way.

Mat:

Thank you.

Darren:

Obviously this job really suits you.

Mat:

Well, maybe, I’ve also managed to stay off the American food which is probably half the reason.

Darren:

Yeah look, I think they’ve mistaken quantity for quality.

Mat:

They have, they have. It’s throughout the whole city that exists let me tell you. It’s hard getting a healthy sandwich in this town.

New business

Darren:

Look, one of the reasons that I really wanted to catch up with you is that you have a long track record and a long history of being particularly good at business development and business building.

Right back from the Icon days through Mediacom then UM and now at IPG Mediabrands.

Mat:

Yeah.

Darren:

I’m just wondering, without giving away your secret sauce, because I wouldn’t ask anyone to give away the special 11 herbs and spices.

Mat:

Sure.

Darren:

What do you think it is that you do that a lot of people overlook in new business? Or what is the attitude or philosophy that you bring to the process that makes you so successful at that? Continue reading “Managing Marketing: The expanding role of the media agency in marketing”

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Digital marketing strategy: Don’t be Robinson Crusoe on your digital island

This post is by Anton Buchner, a senior consultant with TrinityP3. Anton is one of Australia’s leaders in data-driven marketing. Helping navigate through the bells, whistles and hype to identify genuine marketing value when it comes to technology, digital activity, and the resulting data footprint.

digital marketing island

Anyone remember this quote from Daniel Defoe’s legendary book, The life and adventures of Robinson Crusoe?

“…I must acknowledge, that, of all the circumstances of life that ever I had any experience of, nothing makes mankind so completely miserable as that of being in constant fear.”

The fear refers to the threat of being seen as pirates as the ship that Robinson Crusoe was on landed in a little port called Quinchang.

Sorry to start this post with a bit of fear, however, have you experienced a bit of fear in your business life?

Have you come across people floating around on their own virtual digital islands?

Whilst Robinson Crusoe wasn’t a pirate, he did succumb to the temptation to take to sea and tackle life’s adventures.

Being shipwrecked off the coast of West Africa, Crusoe was the sole survivor who ends up becoming the self-proclaimed “king” of his own island. A rollicking adventure unfolds with cannibals, mutineers, and Spanish and English seafarers.

Beware the digital natives living on their own digital islands

Continue reading “Digital marketing strategy: Don’t be Robinson Crusoe on your digital island”

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How using a facilitation company for that overseas TVC production is costing you money

This post is by Clive Duncan a Senior Consultant at TrinityP3. As a Director and DOP he has an appreciation for the value of great creative and outstanding production values, while also recognising the importance of delivering value for money solutions to the advertiser.

Overseas TVC production

A few years ago I wrote a post on the issues associated with shooting overseas

At the time the strong Australian dollar meant that shooting offshore was an attractive opportunity for advertisers and their agencies. My how much has changed in a couple of years and with the vagaries of the foreign exchange rate.

Today the Australian dollar makes shooting domestically more attractive, yet there are still many overseas markets that represent great value for advertisers, especially in a global production market hit by the low growth economic conditions.

One of the issues stopping many advertisers realising the economic benefits of shooting in markets with a lower cost base is the use of facilitation companies and their role in the production process. Especially the way they block savings being returned to the advertiser.

What is a facilitation company?

Continue reading “How using a facilitation company for that overseas TVC production is costing you money”

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Managing marketing: the death of advertising and the power of creativity

Managing Marketing is a podcast hosted by TrinityP3 Founder and Global CEO, Darren Woolley. Each podcast is a conversation with a thought-leader, professional or practitioner of marketing and communications on the issues, insights and opportunities in the marketing management category. Ideal for marketers, advertisers, media and commercial communications professionals.

Sean Cummins, Global CEO of Cummins and Partners talks with Darren on the difference between the Australian advertising industry and that in the USA, the fact that advertising is not dead and the need for advertisers to have more fun with their advertising to deliver greater effectiveness and make a difference to the marketplace.

Sean Cummins Podcast

You can listen to the podcast here:

Follow Managing Marketing on Soundcloud or iTunes

Transcription:

Darren:

Welcome to Managing Marketing. I’m here in New York city with Sean Cummins, Global CEO of Cummins and Partners, welcome Sean.

Sean:

Thanks Darren and thanks for having me, in fact, I’m having you, you’re in my house!

Darren:

Exactly. Here we are in Tribeca but look the first thing I wanted to say is congratulations on being elected, added to the Ad News Hall of Fame, that’s great news.

Sean:

It’s fantastic and I was told that it’s not something they don’t necessarily do every year, it’s when they feel someone was or is worthy and so that makes it feel a little bit better. As you said before, a lifetime achievement award suggests that maybe you haven’t got much more to contribute so it’s nice to be able to say, well I’m famous and could get more famous.

The stark contrast for me being over here now is that I’m in the Hall of Fame over there and on the corridors of anonymity of here, it’s really a different sort of scenario.

Darren:

Well I was wondering, did they give you a trophy or something?

Sean:

They did. It was a nice little A trophy, I felt like I could put it on a chain and walk around certain parts of Manhattan with my homies and kind of swagger but no, it’s somewhere downstairs just looking very proud but yeah, I haven’t been able to wave it around.

Darren:

I was thinking of trying to get into a hot nightclub in Manhattan, you could walk up and go, “Don’t you know who I am? Look, I’m a Hall of Famer!”

Sean:

Yeah, it would be good, but I haven’t really tried that yet but I might because it’s certainly, shaped in such a way that if ever I get in any trouble it’s quickly inserted so I think I could use it to great effect.

Darren:

A weapon of mass destruction.

Sean:

Yes, exactly.

Differences between the US and Australian markets

Continue reading “Managing marketing: the death of advertising and the power of creativity”

Posted in agency search & selection, agency solutions, interesting observations, marketing procurement, Podcasts, social media & digital marketing, strategic management, television & electronic production | Leave a comment

Has the future of the media agency just been shown to us?

This post is by David Angell, General Manager of the fast growing Melbourne market and National Head of Media. David has extensive commercial and media experience gained through a fifteen year career in media agencies, which he uses to help drive optimal results for TrinityP3 clients.

Future of media agency

Has anyone heard of Blackwood Seven? They’re a media agency – no, check that – they’re a technology company – that has recently launched out of Denmark.

And they are already posing a threat of sorts to the traditional media agency model.

Having worked in and around the media agency business for a while, I get used to predictions about ‘the death of the media agency as we know it’.

This message has been playing with increasing intensity over the last year or so, as we all revisit the question of agency transparency – which, because of the efforts of the ANA, is being scrutinised harder than ever before.

Automation is happening…but is it happening right?

A debate partially linked to agency transparency is automation of the media trading process, which, it is argued, will ultimately create more transparency, as well as signalling the death of the media agency as we know it (not that the current automation efforts of media agencies are particularly transparent – at least, not according to the ANA).

I tend to be a bit cynical about proclamations of doom, or wholesale change. But I must admit, Blackwood Seven’s proposition has given me pause for thought.

In a nutshell, the company offers a piece of media trading software, which couples algorithmic mathematics with an AI or self-learning capability, both of which operate together to generate the most efficient, and most effective, media plans.

Essentially, it’s billed as an attribution model, a scenario planner, a channel strategy/channel learning tool and a media booking and evaluation tool, all rolled into one self-serve platform.

Don’t ask me how the machine actually works. But the financial model – self serve platform at a fixed cost, no matter what media an advertiser buys – could, if successful, have an ultimately profound impact on the industry.

For a start, it removes at a stroke any implication of non-transparency on the part of the agency. Self serve platform with no clunky dashboards or multiple interfaces, no commissions, no deals as such given that all inventory is traded via an automated and biddable platform – and a machine that self learns, and is essentially predictive in nature.

Second, it is explained as a ‘real time predictive modelling’ process, which removes a bugbear of more traditional approaches to modelling – namely, that the model is based on historical data.

Third, it is designed to work across all media channels, something that media agencies are starting to achieve with automated buying, but relatively slowly.

Fourth, it wraps all of the above into one platform. Media agencies have been working with multi-touch attribution models and automated trading platforms for a while – but in many cases, the process can be clunky/across multiple systems, and true all-channel automation continues to elude.

Blackwood Seven has recently raised US$13.5m of backing, has wooed clients such as Volkswagen Germany from established names like Mediacom, claims a 25-50% uplift in effectiveness, has launched in the US, is planning entry to the UK market and has an ambition to be a global player.

Also, given it is not actually a media agency as such, it is actively encouraging clients to talk directly to media owners, thus further cutting out a traditional agency.

Traditional media agencies have of course been talking about, and to some extent achieving, automation for some time.

But from necessity, they’ve been trying to adapt it to their own commercial model, rather than starting from scratch – which has in part led to the allegations of murkiness that we’ve all been reading about.

Whether or not Blackwood Seven goes on to be a global game changer is anyone’s guess – perhaps it should ask its own model for a prediction. But it’s in the market and it’s showing no signs of going away.

The threat to the traditional model.

Continue reading “Has the future of the media agency just been shown to us?”

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Is your digital marketing effort destroying your brand?

This post is by Anton Buchner, a senior consultant with TrinityP3. Anton is one of Australia’s leaders in data-driven marketing. Helping navigate through the bells, whistles and hype to identify genuine marketing value when it comes to technology, digital activity, and the resulting data footprint.

Digital marketing and brand

I’d like to pose a question for this post.

I may be deluded or totally off the mark with my answer so I’d love to hear your thoughts.

The question: is digital marketing destroying your brand?

What do I mean by this?

Well I’ve been wrestling with the direction that the marketing and communications industry is going in – especially with the over investment of budgets and resources in digital channels?

What do you think?

Where is the marketing industry going?

Have we lost the art of brand building?

Are we becoming schizophrenic in our marketing communication?

Has the digital disruption and the fact that digital marketing is now mainstream, actually only served to disrupt clarity of planning and the consistency of brand messaging? Continue reading “Is your digital marketing effort destroying your brand?”

Posted in data & direct marketing, industry news & trends, interesting observations, marketing process optimisation, social media & digital marketing | Leave a comment

Consumer goods client reviews media agency performance, value and transparency without a pitch – case study

This post is by David Angell, General Manager of the fast growing Melbourne market and National Head of Media. David has extensive commercial and media experience gained through a fifteen year career in media agencies, which he uses to help drive optimal results for TrinityP3 clients.

Consumer goods

Challenging Problem:

The marketing team had experienced what it believed to be significant challenges with its incumbent media agency. However, the team was unsure as to the actual scale of its own findings:

  • How good or bad was the incumbent agency, relative to the market?
  • Was the incumbent agency being paid correctly, too much or not enough?
  • How transparent was the incumbent agency in its dealings, over the course of a long term relationship?
  • Was it really worth ‘going to pitch’ given that the same problems may end up simply being transferred to a new relationship?

This was a fast-moving team, under pressure to deliver on-going work and results, who had experienced significant internal change over recent months. There was also a necessary internal process via procurement and management required to demonstrate that the supplier needed reviewing.

Consequently, there was a nervousness expressed about trying to do too much, too soon.

Solution:

TrinityP3 recommended a two-stage approach: Continue reading “Consumer goods client reviews media agency performance, value and transparency without a pitch – case study”

Posted in agency remuneration / compensation, agency solutions, media planning & buying, return on investment, social media & digital marketing | Leave a comment

How consumer goods brands can turn the talent casting process on its head and save.

This post is by Clive Duncan a Senior Consultant at TrinityP3. As a Director and DOP he has an appreciation for the value of great creative and outstanding production values, while also recognising the importance of delivering value for money solutions to the advertiser.

talent casting process

While the headline particularly points out consumer goods brands this approach is applicable to all brands with well-developed strategies and disciplined implementation.

This could apply to all types of categories, but is probably not as applicable to services industries. The reason being it requires taking advantage of longer term planning as a way of optimising the cost and contracting of talent be it actors or voice over actors for the production of broadcast video and content.

What is required is to effectively turn the current process on its head and use longer term processes to negotiate the right talent at the best possible but reasonable cost across a multitude of channels and markets.

In the process it requires process change and contract change, two things that the production industry is resistant to embrace. But it is a change that will have huge benefits for advertisers.

The casting process today

The current casting process is a linear one that requires the development and approval of the script, the selection and approval of the director and production company and then the casting process and the negotiations and contracting with the actors and their agents and management at the very end of the process.

The justification of this linear process is that it is impossible to know who to cast until the script is finalised and the director is able to have their input on the selection of the actor. It certainly appears logical; as most linear processes do, but it causes significant timing issues that often end up costing the advertiser dearly.

Why the current process is flawed

Continue reading “How consumer goods brands can turn the talent casting process on its head and save.”

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Is your team managing your agency roster? (Probably not)

This post is by Anton Buchner, a senior consultant with TrinityP3. Anton is one of Australia’s leaders in data-driven marketing. Helping navigate through the bells, whistles and hype to identify genuine marketing value when it comes to technology, digital activity, and the resulting data footprint.

manage agency roster

As marketers, you are most likely managing a roster of agencies: brand, direct, digital, social, PR, media, technology and more.

We are working on a client at the moment with over 100 agencies on their roster.

So whether you manage a few agencies, or a multitude, the question for this post is the same; is your team managing your agency roster or not?

What do I mean by managing?

I mean, successfully taking charge to bring about accomplishments.  

In order to accomplish something, you need to first be clear as to what you actually want to accomplish.

So maybe the first question should be; has your team clearly identified what needs to be achieved?

And if so, then how is the team managing your agencies to successfully achieve it?

Here are 4 areas to focus for successful roster management.

1. Has the team identified individual capability and skill-sets?

Continue reading “Is your team managing your agency roster? (Probably not)”

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Will your silo based approach turn you into the next Kodak?

This post is by Zena Churchill, a Senior Consultant at TrinityP3. Over the past 20 years, Zena has worked for some of the biggest international and national brands. Having worked both agency and client side, Zena has strong insight and experience across most facets of marketing, specialising in media, strategy and BTL.

Silo based approach

A silo is a standalone structure that is used to store grain. It has no other purpose other than to store the grain it has inside it and if another type of grain needs to be stored then a separate silo is employed for the task. These silos do not work together – ever, even if one silo is overflowing and the other silo is only half full.

Similarly, business silos, be they at an organisational or departmental level, are teams that work within their own boundaries, focused on delivering to their own strategies and objectives and behaving as though all the other silos are a direct threat to their very being.

Unfortunately, the silo structure is a regular feature across the marketing function and when in play will be identified by product or channel. If you are really unlucky, your marketing function will be defined by both simultaneously (yes, government departments, I am looking at you).

These marketing departments that structure, intentionally or otherwise, around silos inevitably end up working as a group of independent teams with singular focus on delivering for the benefit of their own team/product/channel and it is a recipe for disaster.

The sad story of Kodak

Most of us are familiar with the story of Kodak. Once the brand juggernaut of the photographic industry, commanding 90% of the film market and 75% of the camera market during the 1970s, Kodak was, in its day, one of the most innovative and marketing savvy companies around; kind of like the early Apple of its era.

So when the company filed for bankruptcy in 2012, after declining sales and an inability to find its rightful place in the changing landscape of the digital photography world (ironic considering they invented the digital camera in 1975), there was a mix of shock and sadness across the market, particularly amongst those of us who grew up capturing ‘Kodak moments’.

Representing a moment in time that was idyllic, worthy of cataloguing and keeping forever, the Kodak moment is now something to avoid, particularly if you work in marketing.

What went wrong?

Continue reading “Will your silo based approach turn you into the next Kodak?”

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