Thank you is a global phenomenon for marketers

This post is by Anton Buchner, a senior consultant with TrinityP3. Anton is a lateral and innovative thinker with a passion for refocusing business teams and strategies; creating visionary, data driven communication plans; and making sense of a more complex digital marketing environment.

It’s a very powerful word – thankyou.

Use it as a noun (ie: a thankyou), when you want to give gratitude to someone who has made a difference in your life.

Use it as a heartfelt verb, thank you, when you want to thank someone directly. For example, I would like to thank you for reading this blog post.

Either way it can create a powerfully positive experience.

So why do so few marketers include it in their marketing strategy?

As an independent consultant, I see a lot of business leaders measuring and benchmarking their marketing activity. They have a report for everything: personal scorecards, business scorecards, customer satisfaction, customer engagement, net promoter scores, return on investment (ROI), media effectiveness, and the list goes on.

And when I ask what is their strategy to improve these measures, I’m generally met with a thick pile of documents and research reports and told, “this is our plan and the current benchmarks”.

After listening I tend to sit back and ask one simple question that stops them in their tracks:

Have you ever thanked your customers and analysed the result?

Thank you image

People love to be thanked and we know that it creates a powerfully positive experience. So why not thank your customers at critical points in their customer journey?

I was working on a Tier 1 global financial services client earlier this year and asked them the same question. After a few weeks of consultancy we had developed a new digital and customer lifecycle plan that also incorporated key ‘thank you’ points.

 How to go about it?

  • thank all new customers for becoming a customer. It’s common courtesy.
  • thank people (including business people) for their first critical action within your product or service lifecycle. A critical action may be a first use of a B2B payment terminal, or a first e-commerce transaction, or an event attendance.
  • then have a look at all the touchpoints that a customer has throughout the lifecycle of your product or service and identify the ones that mean the most to customers. Thank them at these points.
  • thank people for reaching milestones based on their tenure and value to your business.
  • thank people for helping your business reach a certain size, as well as great unit sales, revenue, or softer milestones.
  • thank people for just being engaged with your business.
  • thank people for negative feedback and do something about it. It shows that you are listening.
  • thank people for positive feedback and utilise it for advocacy.

These are just a few of the ways you can start to develop a ‘thank-you’ strategy. Hopefully you can build on them.

It’s also relatively low cost and will generate incredible returns. Measure it and prove it for your business.

So I’d like to thank you again for reading this post, and encourage you to go forth and plan your thank yous!

I would be interested to hear your thoughts on a “thank you” strategy. Leave a comment to let me know.

About Anton Buchner

Anton is one of Australian's leading customer engagement consultants. With an eye for discovering greater marketing value and a love for listening to what customers are really saying about a brand. Anton has helped take global and local businesses including Microsoft, Nestlé, P&G, Gloria Jean's, Foxtel and American Express amongst others to the next level. Check out Anton's full bio here

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