Managing Marketing – Getting better Sales and Marketing collaboration

Managing Marketing is a podcast hosted by TrinityP3 founder and global CEO, Darren Woolley. Each podcast is a conversation with a thought-leader, professional or practitioner of marketing and communications on the issues, insights and opportunities in the marketing management category. Ideal for marketers, advertisers, media and commercial communications professionals.

Peter Strohkorb, CEO of Peter Strohkorb Consulting International shares his thoughts on the role of sales and marketing within organisations and the increasing importance of aligning the two to a common business objective. He and Darren discuss the various challenges and opportunities that present themselves when the two disciplines are aligned.

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Transcript:

Darren:

Okay, welcome and today I’m joined by Peter Strohkorb who is CEO of Peter Strohkorb Consulting International. Now that’s interesting, International, welcome Peter.

Peter:

Thank you Darren.

Darren:

Does that mean you’ve just flown in from some exotic location?

Peter:

Well, not just flown in but in May I was privileged enough to speak at the Sales 2.0 Conference in San Francisco.

Darren:

Oh, okay.

Peter:

And I had to add the international otherwise the Americans might not believe me.

Darren:

Because if you’re not based in America then you must be international.

Peter:

Well, yeah, no, if you’re based in America you must be international. If you’re not based in America then of course you’re not relevant to them.

Darren:

Oh, of course, yes. I’ve struck that many times. But I’m glad that you’re not like Austin Powers, you’re certainly not the international man of mystery. Look Peter, the reason for wanting to catch up and have a chat is because I’ve being following and obviously read quite a lot of what you’ve been sharing on social media and the industry around the concept of sales and marketing being one team and  where I’d like to start is really from your perspective, what are the specific roles of sales and marketing in their own right and what is the overall role of the two together?

What are the specific roles of sales and marketing?

Peter:

Well, let’s start with the last part first. The overall role is of course, to drive the business forward, to get revenue in and to have a business. The role of marketing in that is far broader than the role of sales but the way I like to describe it is that marketing creates an environment where sales can occur.

Darren:

Yeah, good point.

Peter:

And that basically means to have a brand and to have the brand recognised and to have thought leadership attributed to the brand and to basically create awareness in the marketplace that we exist and why people should check out our wares. Sales on the other hand is more interested in moving as quickly as possible to the pointy end of the sale, namely the transaction.

Darren:

Closing the deal?

Peter:

Closing the deal and I like to describe the sales function versus the marketing function as a sort of upside down pyramid whereby the marketing team does the broader perspective in terms of the thought leadership and then the brand it’s on as I described, and then sales tries to drive it to the pointy end where the transaction occurs. And there’s probably a bit of an overlap in between but the two have really fundamentally different outlooks on life.

Darren:

So that’s a good point in that marketing sets up the start and casts the net broad and sales is about the conversion you know, building that relationship and closing the deal.

Peter:

That’s exactly right.

Darren:

So why do you think people call it sales and marketing when chronologically the process seems to be marketing and sales?

Peter:

Well, let’s look at who call it sales and marketing, it’s predominantly salespeople; they call it sales and marketing.

How do CEOs see Sales and Marketing?

Darren:

True, that is very true. So, you know, it’s interesting as well from the CEO perspective, you will find a lot of CEOs will focus on sales and see marketing as sort of more ethereal, what do they call it, the colouring-in department?

Peter:

Yeah, the brochure people or the event people, I’ve heard that too. So, I think you have to consider how CEOs are rewarded and remunerated and it’s usually around the hard coin, the dollar that comes in, not around brand and not around thought leadership. They’re remunerated on how much money they can make the shareholders.

Darren:

Yeah, so they’re more focused on that pointy end where the sales people are.

Peter:

Well, that’s how they’re measured, that’s why they’re focused that way and let’s also be clear that there are not a lot of marketers who make it to CEO level, right, whereas there’s quite a few sales led people that make it to CEO level.

Darren:

Because, traditionally they’ve been very focused on results haven’t they? Sales people are always measured on the actual hard sales results.

Peter:

Yeah, you look at the quarterly share market reviews and there’s not much about marketing in there.

Darren:

And that’s a real pity as well because you know, from the way you describe it and from my own perspective, I remember actually attending one of your CEO breakfasts and when you went around the table and the question, quite a simple but complex question, which was how well does marketing and sales work in your organisation? A lot of people really were challenged with that. Is that your general experience of the marketplace?

The disconnect between Sales and Marketing

Peter:

Yes, well look, I find probably in that forum that was a bit of an exception because other people were listening in but in a one-on-one situation, I find that the sales people have very little problem acknowledging that they could be better supported by marketing.

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

Interestingly though, the marketing people don’t do the same in reverse, what they do is, they say, “Oh yes, I’ve heard that organisations exist where there’s a problem between sales and marketing but not here”.

Darren:

Right. We embrace our sales brethren.

Peter:

Yes, that’s right. Or as one senior marketer in a financial services organisation in Australia told me, “Oh yes, we had that problem before I came a year and a half ago, but no more”. Right?

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

And so I said, “Oh, how did you overcome the problem?” And he said, “Well, the sales team of about one hundred people nationally meets four times a year physically, they come together four times a year. Marketing attends every second time.” And I said, “Oh, so you do come together twice a year. But how do you conduct the collaboration then when you come together?” and he said, “Oh, we give them a presentation”.

Darren:

So they are not actually collaborating, they tell them how it is.

Peter:

So from his perspective, the collaboration was fine because we give them a presentation twice a year.

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

And he called that collaboration.

Darren:

Because it’s interesting, marketers can actually get a lot from sales people from the point of view of where is the customer because it’s the sales people that are actually there in that relationship aren’t they?

Peter:

That’s right. So if marketing does its role well, plays its role well, then they should have  segmented the market, know what the target is and how to position the organisation so that they can be attractive to that desired target audience, right? And that can really make the life of a sales person easier if they know exactly what a customer looks like.

Darren:

Yeah.

Is the Marketing function about supply of leads?

Peter:

Now, a lot of sales people and sales managers and sadly, some CEOs as well, have taken that to mean, “Marketing should supply the leads”. Right?

Darren:

Yes.

Peter:

And then of course there’s the eternal disconnect in terms of what actually is a lead, right?

Darren:

And a hot lead and a warm lead and a cold lead and a qualified lead and a non-qualified lead.

Peter:

That’s right so I’ve seen organisations where marketing have passed on an event attendee list to sales and said, “Here are your leads”.

Darren:

Oh really?

Peter:

Yeah really, and this is a multinational, well-known organisation, I won’t mention the name.

Darren:

No, that’s fine.

Peter:

But the salesman that I spoke to said, “They may as well give me the phone book”.

Darren:

Yeah, exactly.

Peter:

On the other hand, in another multinational, I’ve seen it get to the point where sales has demanded that, “No, no no, we only want leads where the customer is ready to buy now”.

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

In other words, “I don’t actually want to sell, I just want to take the order”. Right? So the rest is up to marketing, they should qualify the lead to the point of order taking, right? But in reality, there’s got to be somewhere in between the two where they agree that they, you know, a lead is actually right before handing over and this is where you get the concept of the marketing qualified lead and the sales accepted lead and all these new things that have come in.

Darren:

Yes.

Peter:

But to me, it’s always a bit of a shame when marketing is reduced to talking about leads.

Darren:

Yeah, because their role is to actually build an environment where people want to do business with you.

Peter:

That’s right.

Darren:

And then hand that environment to the sales people to help them convert.

Peter:

It’s much more than just leads, ideally.

Darren:

Yeah. Well, it’s interesting because they’re working to the same objective but they never seem to be measured against the same objective are they?

Peter:

That’s right and that’s because they’re working in different ways towards the same objective.

Darren:

Yep. Different tools.

Peter:

Well it would be terrible if marketing’s task was selling and vice versa. Right?

Darren:

Well it would definitely, as a prospect; it would be a very different sales experience if a marketer was trying to sell you something.

Diminishing collaboration with distance

Peter:

I’ve heard anecdotally that whenever sales people have taken marketers along for the ride, the marketers have actually been able to add tremendous value to the conversation because they could come from a much broader perspective and give a bit of background in saying, “Oh we’re seeing these trends in the marketplace and this is why we’ve brought this product out” and you know, stuff like that. And the sales guy goes, “Wow, I never thought of saying that”, you know? That’s fantastic so it can actually work out really well.

Darren:

In fact, a friend and a client of mine, and I think I may have shared this with you, Brad Cook at Novartis, he’s the CMO or the head of marketing, and he shares an office with head of sales and they go to not consumer meetings together, but customer meetings in their case, the retailer, and they have a huge amount of value because the marketing and sales are then aligned to what is the objective or what are the needs of the retailer. I mean that seems to be a good example of where things can work together.

Peter:

Yeah, so two things on that. One is, there is a man who postulated a theory in the 1970s and his name is Thomas Allen and it’s the famous Allen curve and what he postulated is that collaboration diminishes with distance.

Darren:

Oh okay.

Peter:

And you’d say, “Duh”.

Darren:

That’s true.

Peter:

But what he found is that the way that the collaboration diminishes with distance is not linear, so it doesn’t go down in a nice even way.

Darren:

No, it’s exponential is it?

Peter:

Anti logarithmic, that’s right, it does that way, right? And the curve is very steep in the beginning and then there’s a long tail.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

Where collaboration just peters out and interestingly, he found that the critical distance where 70% of collaboration had diminished was ten yards.

Darren:

Really, thirty feet? Or you know, about ten meters.

Peter:

And so what he found was that you know, if you’re sitting next to each other or share the same office, you can just lean over and say, “Hey Joe, what do you think of this? And Jo can say, “It sucks” or, he can say, “It’s great” or you know, “It needs more work” or whatever. Whereas if I have to get up and walk to the other end of the corridor, I might think twice about it. If I have to take the lift down to another floor, I’ll think three times about it, you know, and so collaboration diminishes with distance so that by having teams co-locate, is actually a great collaboration tool, right?

Darren:

Well I remember at News Corp in Sydney here, they have the sales team and the marketing team and even the sales support teams all on the same floor as a way of encouraging that, you know, collaboration and interaction.

Peter:

And that’s smart, you know. I worked for a multinational organisation in Sydney and we had marketing on one floor and sales on the other and then of course sales in the other states as well and the further away they were, the less we communicated with them, you know and it really created a big “us and them” type of atmosphere.

Darren:

Because there’s also a change happening in marketing, which I know you’re aware of which is that the marketers are in the process of being more accountable to the financial performance, are moving to this customer management. You know, the customer experience and the customer, you know, managing the customer journey. In many ways, this is putting them more and more into needing to interact and collaborate with sales isn’t it?

The importance of the customer experience

Peter:

Yes, so that’s the whole thing of customer focus and then coming out of that is the whole new trend now about customer experience and we’ve realised that the customer experience doesn’t just start with them looking at our website and doesn’t end with them making a transaction. We know that there’s an after-sales experience.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

Particularly in terms of support and we know that in the era of the buyer’s journey where people go online and inform themselves over their choices and options, before they even speak to a sales rep, it depends on whose statistics you believe but between 50 and 90% of the decision making is already completed before they talk to a warm-blooded salesperson. Alright. And so the challenge for the sales rep then is to actually tell them something because the buyer is just coming to complete the transaction and just to place the order basically you know and they might haggle a bit.

Darren:

Yeah, how do they add value as a salesperson if they have nothing new or interesting to add?

Peter:

That’s right. Well, this is it, I spoke to a representative from a very large multinational car manufacturer and they said they have the problem that people have informed themselves online and they come into the showroom basically to just test drive the car and to haggle for the best price so they say, “You know, I want this brand, I want this model, I want this colour, I want these accessories, what’s your best price mate?” right?

Darren:

Yeah. So they’ve reduced them purely to price.

Peter:

Yeah. And there’s one lady that I interviewed for my book and she went through exactly that process with a different brand and I asked her, “If you had been able to buy the car online, would you have done it?” And she said, “Yeah, absolutely. I just went into the showroom to test drive the car”. So in what we now call commodity sales, the sales rep almost becomes superfluous.

Darren:

Well, over the weekend in fact, I needed to get some new batteries for my Sony camera and I went to six stores and they either didn’t have them or they were infinitely more expensive than what I knew I could get them for online. And having spent, you know, like two or three hours going from store to store, I ended up going home and just buying them online and I just got a notification so I ordered them Sunday and they’re going to be delivered tomorrow morning so it’s just phenomenal. But that’s one of the things that you know, you hear a lot of the speculation that technology will actually take over more and more of the sales function you know. As e-commerce and purchasing online becomes the way of doing business.

Peter:

Well certainly in retail and certainly in commodity sales, the sales reps become superfluous, you know, people can go online and inform themselves over their choices, find out what they want and then buy it. You know, no sales rep involved. And there’s a lot of disruptive models emerging from that you know, and the one I like the best is a recent thing whereby there’s this clothing store and I forget the name, and I probably shouldn’t mention it anyway if I remembered, where they actually have only one of everything.

Darren:

Right, okay.

Peter:

And it’s particularly aimed at men who don’t like clothes shopping right. So you can go into this store, you can try on everything in your size, you can order it but you can’t take it away with you.

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

They have no inventory. They only have the stock to try on.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

And then you order it online and then it gets delivered to your home.

Darren:

Fantastic idea.

Peter:

So they don’t have the problem with stock holding and logistics and that sort of stuff. It’s just all done from one central warehouse and they can do fantastic service and they can deliver it much more cheaply.

Darren:

I just hope they don’t do underpants. Or swimwear, yeah of course. But you know, that’s one of the issues is that there are now multiple ways. Marketing, as you’ve said earlier on, marketing sets up the environment, the perception, the attitude towards a brand or a business. There are multiple ways that people will interact and that relationship will get built because I think that’s one of the great undervalued things about a sales team is that they are actually also relationship managers, aren’t they?

Peter:

Well, this is it, where we actually have the need for a relationship or where a relationship is desirable for whatever reason, you need to actually have a human being involved, right. And that’s where they can add value. And so you have more a tendency for account managers, you know, managing an existing account and make sure that the customer is happy from that perspective. Or, you have subject matter experts because you think about it, if you want to buy something that’s a bit more complicated than say a car, let’s say if you want to buy a million dollar I.T.

Darren:

Yeah, technology is a key area.

Buying a long term relationship

Peter:

Where you’re not just buying a $5 pencil, you’re actually spending a large amount of money, you’re buying a complex product, you’re buying a relationship because the contract that you buy will usually last from three to five years and then there’s renewals and all that sort of thing so you’re actually buying a relationship and you need to know, will I be able to get on with these people over three or five years, because I’ll be contractually obligated to do so.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

And so, what happens is that the number of decision makers becomes larger, so it’s not just one person walking into a store buying a pencil, it’s a group of people, usually there’s a procurement person and a finance person and there’s an engineering person and so on and so on.

Darren:

Yeah, it’s a group decision.

Peter:

Maybe.

Darren:

Or a group influence, yeah.

Peter:

There’s multiple gate-keepers and that sort of thing. But that’s where the selling becomes a lot more complicated because it’s not just a simple transaction any longer, and it could go on for certainly months and if not years sometimes over a large tender scenario and the terrible thing is organisations spend millions of dollars on these things and then there’s only one winner, which is why some organisations in America have, I don’t want to say colluded, but they’re partnering with their competitors because they’re saying, “If we win and you lose, then it’s a horrible loss for you and we probably won’t get much of a win out of it because by the time that we win, they’ve squeezed us down to absolute zero. So if we partner as competitors and we just, split the…”

Darren:

Split the risk and split the rewards, yeah.

Peter:

Yes, and the rewards, then everybody wins. And that actually makes a lot of sense to me.

Darren:

Collaborative business.

Peter:

Collaborative bidding.

Darren:

Yeah, fantastic. Look, your consultancy business is about working with organisations to get the alignment I guess of marketing and sales and to reap the benefits of that.

Peter:

Yes.

The causes of misalignment

Darren:

Before we talk about the positives, you mentioned before that often marketing and sales will be working to the same objective but with different tools. Well what do you think are the causes of the misalignment between the two? Let’s look at the negative because that’s always more interesting before we start talking about the solutions.

Peter:

You never hear about the plane that landed on time, right?

Darren:

No, that’s right.

Peter:

Okay.

Darren:

And don’t name anyone because this is not a name and shame exercise.

Peter:

Okay, so there’s two things. We talked about the broader perspective of marketing and the more narrow perspective in terms of closing the sale to the point of transaction for sales. But there’s a historical reason as well.

Darren:

Okay.

Peter:

I was nearly going to write a blog called, ‘Is it all Phillip Kotler and Neil Rackham’s fault?’ right?

Darren:

Right. Please explain.

Peter:

Yes, I’d love to. And what happened was that Phillip Kotler talked about marketing as a discipline.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

And Neil Rackham talked about selling as a discipline. And the prevalent management theory at the time was, “Well, if we have dedicated disciplines, then we must create centres of excellence”.

Darren:

Right.

Peter:

And so we’ve created a sales department and we’ve created a marketing department.

Darren:

And never the twain shall meet.

Peter:

That’s right. And so then we have appointed a head of sales and a head of marketing and they might talk to each other because they have to because they’ve got to present a united front to the CEO. But the people underneath may not have that sort of relationship at all, you know. And so we then have a scenario whereby marketing resides at head office and sales is distributed all around the country, or the region or the world or you know, whatever. And we have a decentralised sales force and a centralised marketing team and you develop this ‘us and them’ attitude. And I’ve heard plenty being said about each other.

Darren:

They’re both very good at actually blaming the other, aren’t they?

Peter:

Yes. I’ve heard things and I’ve cited this in my book as well, that sales says about marketing, “What do they even do? We bring in the dollars, they spend it. They should be working for us”.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

And conversely, I’ve actually had this said to my face, so it’s first-hand experience that a marketer said, “What’s the difference between a sales person and a marketing person?”

Darren:

Yeah.

Peter:

An education!

Darren:

Yeah, they can be pretty cruel can’t they?

Peter:

So there’s not a lot of respect there in some quarters for one or the other.

The One Team Method

Darren:

Now Peter you mentioned your book, it’s ‘The One Team Method’ by Peter Strohkorb and it says at the top, “How sales and marketing collaboration can boost big business”. Now that’s available on Amazon, isn’t it?

Peter:

Absolutely, in hard copy and in soft copy form

Darren:

Even hard copy.

Peter:

That’s right.

Darren:

So as a gift to the sales director or the soft copy to keep for yourself as the marketing director, huh?

Peter:

As long as it doesn’t end up in the top drawer and never gets opened.

Darren:

Now, without giving the book away with all of the insights, because it’s a sizeable book, but you know, what are some of the things that CEOs for instance, or even CMOs or heads of marketing, what should they be doing as a way of starting to get people to work together? Apart from calling yourself of course for some consulting help.

Peter:

That would be the preferred method of course. So what should CEOs do? Well, I advocate that there’s three steps and if you bring it back to the old management saying that you can’t manage what you can’t measure, then I advocate that you actually do a bit of an analysis, an assessment first, and in my book I describe how there’s a spectrum of maturity for collaboration.

Darren:

Okay.

The collaboration maturity spectrum

Peter:

So collaboration maturity spectrum and you can be at the lower end of maturity where you have basically what I describe as barb-wire fences between the departments where sales leads and brochures and collateral are created by marketing, then thrown over the fence to sales, wiping their hands and then saying, “It’s up to you to sell now”. Meanwhile, sales goes, “Well, that’s not really what we need to sell, we better create our own marketing because marketing is useless.”

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

So you get this really weird situation whereby marketing creates stuff that nobody uses and you get the situation in the sales environment where they’re playing marketing instead of selling and being distracted from their core activity and it’s actually a huge amount of wasted effort and time and money on both sides. So if only they talked to each other and if sales could help marketing to understand what works for sales, then marketing can make a much better informed decision in terms of what they need to provide to help sales sell. But if they don’t talk to each other, then they’re both left in the dark and they would never know. So I advocate that we understand at what level of maturity the relationship is at.

And then put the appropriate measures in place to make that not only improve, but also to make it extend beyond head office and to make it sustainable. Because yes, you can go in and say, “You guys just sort it out”, you know, and that might last for ten minutes, it’s not going to last for ten years.

Darren:

Yeah.

Peter:

Neil Rackham himself was actually quite kind and he wrote about my book that it seems to be a proper method to actually make the relationship last, right?

Darren:

Yeah, a long-term, sustainable, functional relationship.

Peter:

You know, with the methodology behind it, as opposed to just patting the two on the back and saying, “Get along”. You know. And that was really nice, a really nice differentiator because there’s many articles been written about sales and marketing collaboration saying why they should get together, but very few and I’ve not actually found any, that say how that should occur and you know, how you make it last.

Social media and the customer experience

Darren:

Because one of the things in a world where we’re more and more concerned about the customer experience of a brand from a marketing perspective and also, worry where the customer through social media or through social networking, can become almost a broadcaster in their own right of poor customer experience or brand experience, it must be vitally critical for organisations to be able to align that marketing and sales function.

Peter:

Well, social media is an interesting aspect because if you think about it, you ignore it at your peril as an organisation, yet whose role is it to monitor what’s being said? And a lot of organisations have then the added challenge of how far to allow their employees to promote their own personal brands.

Darren:

Yes.

Peter:

Right. So you know, as you say, every person can be their own broadcaster now. So as a sales rep, I can broadcast about myself, right?

Darren:

Yeah, and promote my own personal brand as part of being a functional or effective salesperson for the business.

Peter:

That’s right. Well, they probably would tend to promote themselves as a subject matter expert in a particular field.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

Right, I specialise in this area and I’m the sales champion.

Darren:

Just as you and I both do in our fields.

Peter:

Never, never.

Darren:

Peter, I’ve seen your social media activity, yes.

Peter:

And so, that makes them pretty mobile, you know. They could easily transfer those skills to another organisation and the employer would not be able to do anything about it and so a lot of organisations are really struggling with the notion of how far do we let our sales people go to promote themselves and their personal brand because you know, we want them to promote our brand, not their personal brand. But then on the other hand, if we have the guru in a particular field working for us, that stands us in good stead as well so it’s a bit of a dilemma, a challenge. And in the sense of social media and monitoring it, I forget what the exact statistics are but apparently if there’s a bad sentiment, it gets amplified by an order of magnitude more than a positive sentiment.

Darren:

Yep, I’ve seen that as well.

Peter:

It’s going to be the old adage that if something bad happens you tell a hundred people, if something good happens, you tell ten.

Darren:

Bad news carries. Like you said, no one remembers the plane that landed on time.

Peter:

And the interesting thing is that very few CEOs are even thinking about that. They go, “Well there’s marketing and it’s all outbound” and nobody thinks about, “Oh, should we monitor the Twittersphere and if somebody says something bad about us, what do we do? Should we do something? Should we just let it go away or what?”

Darren:

Well, all the evidence and case studies show that as you say, you ignore it at your own peril.

Peter:

The worst thing you can do is ignore it, that’s right.

Darren:

But you know, as part of the customer experience you know, and marketers are now moving into that customer experience management and sales people exist in the customer experience because the sales process is customer experience. Call centres are part of the customer experience. Retail outlets, full of sales people, are part of the customer experience.

Peter:

And let’s not forget the online experience either.

Darren:

And the online experience. So these are all areas that within the same objective of driving customer value and converting that into business revenue or business profit.

Peter:

Well, I mentioned the car manufacturer, right.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

And they have of course the showrooms where you can go and test drive the car. They have an online presence where people can go and inform themselves over their choices and what the latest model looks like and what colours they have and so on, but then there’s also the service centre. And to the organisation until not that long ago, the service centre was something completely different post sale to anything that would lure in a new buyer. Yet, in the era of social media,

Darren:

It’s critical!

Peter:

It’s all part of the customer experience, right? And again, as we said earlier, if you have a poor experience, you’re going to talk about it much more loudly and broadly than otherwise.

Darren:

So spend x amount of thousands and thousands of dollars on this car only to get screwed around in the service area.

Peter:

Well, I think we can mention it because it’s a public domain.

Darren:

Yep.

Peter:

There was this famous incident with the guy who bought a Jeep.

Darren:

Oh yes, and he ended up wrecking his, destroying his Jeep.

Peter:

Well not only that, but also, he lost a court case and the company made him, or the judge made him write a letter of apology to Jeep right. And his letter of apology was like, “Oh, I’m sorry that I bought a Jeep. I’m sorry that this went wrong. I’m sorry that I had this bad experience. I’m sorry that all this happened”.

Darren:

Yeah, yeah, he managed to turn it around.

Peter:

And the last line was, “I’m sorry I bought a Jeep”. And then apparently he paid people to come in and that people could bid to come in and destroy certain parts of the car and he made more than the car was worth I believe.

Darren:

So social media at work. Well, Peter, that’s been fascinating and look, I’ll just say, the book is, ‘The One Team Method’ by Peter Strohkorb. And thank you very much for coming and talking to me.

Peter:

Thank you Darren, it’s been a pleasure.

Darren:

And by the way, I’ve got a book, if you want to buy a copy.

Peter:

Okay, I will.

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About Darren Woolley

Darren is considered a thought leader on all aspects of marketing management. A Problem Solver, Negotiator, Founder & Global CEO of TrinityP3 – Marketing Management Consultants, founding member of the Marketing FIRST Forum and Author. He is also a Past-Chair of the Australian Marketing Institute, Ex-Medical Scientist and Ex-Creative Director. And in his spare time he sleeps. Darren’s Bio Here Email: darren@trinityp3.com

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